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Max Antonucci

Journalist turned full-time coder, part-time ponderer.

Hello Readers.

I’m Max Antonucci. I write code, blog posts, notebooks, and musings.

As a programmer, I code for the front-end and back-end. For my work, I write a lot of JavaScript, Ruby, and Ruby on Rails. I'm also building more specialized knowledge in web accessibility and design systems.

As a writer, I write to remember lessons I've learned in programming, psychology, philosophy, and absurd topics that tend to confuse my friends.

As a human being, I enjoy reading, boxing, and some casual gaming. I don't enjoy paying bills, getting too little sleep, and fighting my inner demons of perfectionism and self-pressure.

As a chainsaw juggler, I don't do anything since I don't exist.

Recent Writing

My blog is where I keep my big lessons. Sometimes they're important code knowledge or concepts. Sometimes it's career or life lessons. Other times it's broad changes in how I think. But they're all short stories taken from the novel of my life.

You can read more of my blog here.

Recent Notes

Whatever I want to write but can't quite fit into my blog goes here. From the profound to the silly to the random, it shall be scribbled in a note.

You can read more of my notes here.

January 14, 2021

Many white supremacists are rarely explicit in their goals of pushing non-white races below them. Much of that work was done by past (and maybe present) policies like redlining, the prison pipeline, over-policing, and underinvestment in many nieghborhood's welfare/education/health/infrastructure, to name a few.

One only needs to be against or indifferent to policies aiming to undo all these racism-caused inequalities to be racist. No matter how many "Black Lives Matter" signs are in your yard.

January 12, 2021

In 1790, the United States passed the Naturalization Act to set the first rules for how a non-citizen becomes a US citizen. But the law was limited to "free white person(s)...of good character."

This was the same time slavery was happening in the United States, creating a huge gap in how citizens and non-citizens were treated. Understandably, new arrivals wanted to be seen as "white." Especially Irish, Italian, and German immigrants that were first seen as either "non-white" or just "partially white."

That didn't change over a century later when people brought the issue to court. In the 1922 SCOTUS case "Ozawa v. United States," a Japanese-American man argued he should be included under the category of "free white persons." A year later in "United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind," an Indian Sikh man argued the same thing. Both lost.

The United State's naturalization laws have evolved since 1790, but race has played a key role. Society has defined what it means to be white, how humans changed that definition, and racial privilege.

This is all in case someone dismisses the idea of race being a social construct as "absurd." Why pass laws and have court hearings over race if it's part of nature? Otherwise, we'd have witnessed the 1889 SCOTUS case "United States v. Gravity."